Trabajo, estrés y salud: la costura a domicilio en Ciudad de México.

People who work in sewing face precarious working and living conditions; the domestic setting of this work increases harm, as many workers are subjected to working conditions that can adversely affect their health. The aim of this study was to identify hazardous and potentially stressful working con... Deskribapen osoa

Egile nagusia: Pulido Navarro, Margarita
Beste egile batzuk: Garduño Andrade, María de los Angeles, Morales Estrella, Sandra Luz, Lara Flores, Norma Laura
Formatua: Artikulua
Hizkuntza: Gaztelania
Argitaratua: Instituto de Altos Estudios en Salud Pública "Dr. Arnaldo Gabaldón" 2012
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Laburpena: People who work in sewing face precarious working and living conditions; the domestic setting of this work increases harm, as many workers are subjected to working conditions that can adversely affect their health. The aim of this study was to identify hazardous and potentially stressful working conditions and their association with adverse health outcomes in a group of seamstresses and tailors in Mexico City. One hundred thirty-eight surveys were administered, centered on demographic, socioeconomic, and occupational risk factors, together with job demands and health. We applied a stress questionnaire, a domestic workload questionnaire and a guide to observe the work process. We performed univariate and bivariate analysis. We interviewed 26 men and 112 women; mean age was 40.8 years (SD ± 10.3). Several occupational risks and potentially stressful demands were reported; morbidity was 390 incidents per 100 workers. The most common adverse health effects were chronic conjunctivitis, varicose veins, back pain, musculoskeletal disorders, chronic fatigue, headache, anxiety, sleep disorders, hearing loss, chronic nasopharyngitis, depression, hemorrhoids, and dermatitis. The prevalence of stress was 23 per 100 workers. Among others, the following statistically significant associations were found: prolonged awkward positions and uncomfortable seating with back pain, repetitive and heavy work with chronic fatigue, monotonous work with depression; long working hours, exposure to noise, repetitiveness and inability to be away from work for more than 5 minutes was associated with stress. We conclude that these adverse health effects are associated with poor working conditions. Interventions targeted at work organization, ergonomics, job redesign and better coverage of health services are urgently needed.