Chantal Meloni and Gianni Tognoni (eds). Is There a Court for Gaza?. A Test Bench for International Justice

Is There a Court for Gaza? is an edited collection of essays that grew out of a conference held in Rome in May 2009. The book has five parts and a foreword written by Professor William Schabas. Part I contains selected excerpts from the conference in Rome. Part II consists of articles on the Goldsto... Deskribapen osoa

Egile nagusia: Kattan, Victor
Formatua: Artikulua
Hizkuntza: Ingelesa
Argitaratua: Oxford University Press 2013
Sarrera elektronikoa: http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/oaiart?codigo=4203124
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Laburpena: Is There a Court for Gaza? is an edited collection of essays that grew out of a conference held in Rome in May 2009. The book has five parts and a foreword written by Professor William Schabas. Part I contains selected excerpts from the conference in Rome. Part II consists of articles on the Goldstone Report and Part III addresses the debate on Palestinian statehood with regard to the Article 12(3) declaration lodged at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in January 2009. Part IV looks at the Russell Tribunal for Palestine and Part V ends with some concluding remarks by John Dugard, the former UN Special Rapporteur for Human Rights in the Occupied Palestinian Territory. This collection of articles stands out from most books on the Israeli�Palestinian conflict because it is concerned with seeking justice for Israeli and Palestinian victims of human rights violations at an international court which has the ability to enforce its judgments against individuals. This is a new development in this long-running conflict, which has seen many high-ranking officials on both sides accused of committing war crimes and crimes against humanity escape the long arm of the law. With the exception of the advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) on the wall in 2004, for much of the conflict's history infringements of international law have been largely left to political institutions such as the UN Security Council (where the US has usually exercised its veto), the UN General Assembly, and the Human Rights Council in Geneva. This review focuses on Parts II and III of the book which contain academic commentary on the Goldstone Report, and the controversy over whether Palestine was a state at the time when its Minister of Justice lodged a declaration under Article 12(3) of the Rome Statute �