O erotismo como elemento capaz de promover o diálogo entre culturas e grupos étnicos diferentes

Eroticism � more present in some human types than others � may be defended as able to bring together people from different cultures and ethnicities and promote dialogue between them. More than just a simple hypothesis, this is a affirmation central to Gilberto Freyre�s remarkable book Casa Grande &... Deskribapen osoa

Egile nagusia: Cavendish Wanderley, Márcia
Formatua: Artikulua
Hizkuntza: Portugalera
Argitaratua: Instituto de Ciências Humanas e Filosofia. Universidade Federal Fluminense 2013
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Laburpena: Eroticism � more present in some human types than others � may be defended as able to bring together people from different cultures and ethnicities and promote dialogue between them. More than just a simple hypothesis, this is a affirmation central to Gilberto Freyre�s remarkable book Casa Grande & Senzala regarding the attitude displayed by Portuguese colonisers towards the conquered lands, and in particular, Brazil. Translated for the first time to English as The Masters and the Slaves, the book became the subject of widespread criticism in 1930 for its intellectual flights and creating an almost realistic vision of Brazilian colonial society and therefore masking the conflicts inherent to slavery. It also served to develop a concept of racial democracy which is supposedly predominant in modern Brazil. The book has however come back into favour among readers, and not just due to its exceptional literary force. The originality of its contradictory arguments has also come to light as a type of zigzag criticism. From another point of view, the pathology of a patriarchal society emerges from Casa Grande & Senzala to reveal to its readers how the sexual relations in such a society were governed by domination and exploitation. Considering what Foucault says in The History of Sexuality (Vol. II) allows us to see the principle of isomorphism in sexual relations.