La distribución territorial de los recursos sanitarios: algunas propuestas

This paper summarises some of the territorial inequalities in the delivery of health care services, and consequently inequalities in population's health, for the Spanish Comunidades Autonomas. One of the causes for these differences comes from the criteria for allocating resources that has increasin... Deskribapen osoa

Egile nagusia: Jiménez Aguilera, Juan de Dios
Formatua: Artikulua
Hizkuntza: Gaztelania
Argitaratua: Universidad de Almería 2007
Sarrera elektronikoa: http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/oaiart?codigo=2295794
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Laburpena: This paper summarises some of the territorial inequalities in the delivery of health care services, and consequently inequalities in population's health, for the Spanish Comunidades Autonomas. One of the causes for these differences comes from the criteria for allocating resources that has increasingly departed from the pure capitative system. In particular, the new health care financing model (2002) has changed the traditional definition of need, incorporating two new adjusting factors to the previous criterion: population older than 65 years old and insularity. An analysis of convergence in health status, proxied as life expectancy at birth and infant mortality rates, shows that health inequalities exist, and that these inequalities are increasing in recent years among Spanish provinces. On the other hand, since the area of residence of an individual has received little attention, this article explores to what extent the territory determines a different pattern of utilisation of the public health care services. The policy implication of these findings is that care should be taken in the selection of adjusting factors to allocate health care resources. This does not seem to be the case for Spain, where the introduction of a higher weight attached to the variable population older than 65 years old has had little justification in the current health care financing model.