Plain English in Québec Legislation

Why is it that the average person, even a well-educated one, setting out to read a bill or law for the first time, half if not fully expects to have trouble cutting through the language to get to the meaning? It could be argued that bills and statutes use complex language because they address comple... Deskribapen osoa

Egile nagusia: Day, Lena
Formatua: Artikulua
Hizkuntza: Ingelesa
Argitaratua: Commonwealth Parliamentary Association, Canadian Region 2007
Sarrera elektronikoa: http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/oaiart?codigo=2289292
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Laburpena: Why is it that the average person, even a well-educated one, setting out to read a bill or law for the first time, half if not fully expects to have trouble cutting through the language to get to the meaning? It could be argued that bills and statutes use complex language because they address complex subjects¿taxation or securities regulation, for example¿or because they are meant mainly for people ¿in the know¿ such as members of lobby groups, practitioners in the fields concerned, lawyers and officials. The bottom line, though, is that laws affect everyone and this alone is a compelling argument for using idiomatic and understandable language. This article looks at efforts made by the Québec National Assembly to introduce plain English in its legislation.