La eutanasia en niños en Holanda: ¿el final de un plano inclinado?

The Dutch Paediatric Society has recently accepted neonatal euthanasia in exceptional circumstances and under strict conditions following the advises of Dr E Vergahen and Dr. P Sauer, at the centre of an international controversy about euthanasing infants with extremely poor quality of life. These a... Deskribapen osoa

Egile nagusia: Moreno Villares, José Manuel
Beste egile batzuk: Galiano Segovia, María José
Formatua: Artikulua
Hizkuntza: Gaztelania
Argitaratua: Asociación Española de Bioética y Ética Médica, AEBI 2005
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Sarrera elektronikoa: http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/oaiart?codigo=1704056
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Laburpena: The Dutch Paediatric Society has recently accepted neonatal euthanasia in exceptional circumstances and under strict conditions following the advises of Dr E Vergahen and Dr. P Sauer, at the centre of an international controversy about euthanasing infants with extremely poor quality of life. These authors have used the New England Journal of Medicine to publicise their ticklist for determining when doctors can legitimately kill children with their parents' consent. Their requirements are simple: hopeless and unbearable suffering, a certain diagnosis and prognosis, confi rmation by another doctor, the informed consent of the parents, and accepted medical practice. Inevitably, such considerations lead to worries about slippery slopes. The arguments given by the authors seem quite simplistic and are based on the utilitarian principle that suffering is the worst possible evil. Treatment of pain and suffering should be a priority for all the clinicians. Studies over the past 15 years suggest that neonates, infants, and children can receive analgesia and anaesthesia safely, with proper age-related adjustements in clinical practice and dosing. Besides the development of palliative care has allowed to improve the quality of life, to maintain the dignity, and to ameliorate the suffering of seriously ill or dying children as well as in their families in ways that are appropriate to their upbringing, culture and community. Directly bringing about death of children through use of lethal drugs is found ethically unacceptable. Great caution and care are necessary.