La dialéctica política en Andalucía: Partidos y autogiobierno

The aim is to explore the relationship between the political sub-system in place in the Autonomous Community of Andalusia following the first autonomous community elections in 1982 and the self-government process over the last twenty years. To what extent have the parliamentary forces and institutio... Deskribapen osoa

Egile nagusia: Acosta Sánchez, José
Formatua: Artikulua
Hizkuntza: Gaztelania
Argitaratua: Universidad de Almería 2002
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Laburpena: The aim is to explore the relationship between the political sub-system in place in the Autonomous Community of Andalusia following the first autonomous community elections in 1982 and the self-government process over the last twenty years. To what extent have the parliamentary forces and institutions of the Autonomous Andalusian Government, the Junta, effectively managed to implement the Statute of Autonomy and the results obtained been consistent with the targets set in the Statute? This is the main question tackled. At the core of the study is the theory that negative factors have had more influence than positive factors during the formation and evolution of Andalusian self-government, from the approval of the Statute in December 1981 to the present, and the worst of these negative factors was the formation, development and performance of the parliamentary parties (the PSOE, PP, IU-CA and PA and the predecessors of the last three parties, the UCD and AP, PCE and PSA), together with the actions of the bodies of the Junta (the Parliament, representation of the people of Andalusia, the Government Council, with the President and Councilors and the President of the Junta, the head of the autonomous government, the highest representative of the autonomous government and of central government in Andalusia). The investigation then explores the particular characteristics and features which distinguish the origins of Andalusian self-government (1977 to 1982) from the dynamics of the Andalusian political subsystem from the birth and development of the other sixteen autonomous communities of Spain. This is approached in two ways: by comparing the Andalusian Autonomous Community with the two most powerful communities, the Basque and Catalan communities, on the one hand, and with the remaining fourteen communities on the other, placing particular emphasis on the various processes that have taken place in the fourteen communities which serve to illustrate the specific Andalusian experience and to assess and take stock of Andalusian self-government. The main conclusion is that, after a brilliant foundational period (1977 to 1982), Andalusian selfgovernment went on to become weighed down by frustrations, paradoxes and incompetence and increasingly influenced by national politics: during its first three terms (1982 to 1994) it evolved under the total hegemony of the dominant state party, the PSOE, and during the last three terms under the growing confrontation between the two largest central government parties, the PP and PSOE.