Nuevas teorías del crecimiento económico: una lectura desde la perspectiva de los territorios de la periferia

From their origins, the policies guided to promote the regional development have been linked to sone model or theory of the economic growth. These theories received their biggest impulse after the crisis of the 29, under the influence of the keynesian thought. The capitalist crisis of halffilled of... Deskribapen osoa

Egile nagusia: Mattos, Carlos A. de
Formatua: Artikulua
Hizkuntza: Gaztelania
Argitaratua: Universidad de Almería 2000
Sarrera elektronikoa: http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/oaiart?codigo=252845
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Laburpena: From their origins, the policies guided to promote the regional development have been linked to sone model or theory of the economic growth. These theories received their biggest impulse after the crisis of the 29, under the influence of the keynesian thought. The capitalist crisis of halffilled of the 70 supposed the exhaustion of this theory and the renovated influence of the neoclassical models that postulate that the free game of the forces of the market assures a bigger economic efficiency and, therefore, the evolution toward an inevitable interregional convergence. In the measure that the reality has not validated the optimistic forecasts of these models, from the same heart of the neoclassical school a new explanation is gestated about the economic growth; it would be conditioned basically by the accumulation of physical capital, human capital and knowledge 1 where this can be explained by endogenous decisions stimulated by the gain. In that context, in the essential thing, the public policies should look for to establish a favorable macroeconomic environment to stimulate the endogenous accumulation of the factors that promote the growth. By the light of this "new" diagnosis and of their respective therapy, the future of the territories of the periphery doesn't appear promissory. Several '"stylized facts" show that the dominant tendencies favor those who have a productive history that assures them a bigger initial territorial fertility territorial. Under this perspective it doesn't seem easy to revert the image affered by the new international map where the coexistence of both, winning territories and of losing territories, it seems relentless.